Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

Hello there, and welcome to my stop on the Spring Fling blog hop!

What is it about longer days and warmer weather that lifts our spirits and makes us feel like anything is possible? In my corner of the world, spring doesn’t last very long, and summer can be – well, let’s just leave it at “unpleasant.” But spring is my favorite time of year, and when I’m not outside enjoying it, I find myself wanting to get crafty.

I’m a recent convert to the idea of using a planner for fun and function, and since I discovered MAMBI’s Happy Planner, I’ve enjoyed coming up with new accessories for it. Today I’m sharing a mixed media cover set for the HP Mini.

Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

It was a lot of fun to make, and I’m in love with how it turned out. Included is a step-by-step tutorial for you to make your own, as well. Enjoy!

  1. Gather supplies

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    White cardstock, Perfect Medium embossing pen gelatos, cling wrap, water sprayer bottle, clear embossing ink, HP punch. (Not shown: laminator and laminating sheets)

  2. Draw your design

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Mandala design – I googled “hand drawn mandala” and took inspiration from some I saw in the search results.

  3. Emboss
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Cover design completely with embossing powder, then shake off the excess.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Design covered with embossing powder. Use a heat gun to melt the powder.

  4. Add media
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    I used gelatos in spring-inspired colors: robin’s egg blue, sky blue, grass green, and daffodil yellow.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Put the color medium of your choice onto a sheet of cling wrap, then spray water generously to get the color moving.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    “Smash” the color onto the white cardstock. You may need to pick up the plastic and move it around to get the coverage you want.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Your embossed design will show through the color.

  5. Add finishing touches
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    I handwrote the phrase “Make it Happen” with the embossing pen, then covered it with gold embossing powder.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Added some “zazzies” and heated the powder.

  6. Laminate
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    For a Happy Planner mini, both covers should fit into one laminating sheet.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Use a 4 mil laminating sheet for a really sturdy cover.

  7. Trim and punch
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    After trimming away the excess laminate, use a page from your Happy Planner to line up where holes should be punched. Use a grease pencil or marker to mark placement.

    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Turn the punch upside down to see where the holes should align. Make sure the edge of the cover is inserted all the way into the punch before punching.

     

  8. Bind
    Make your own planner cover in an afternoon with a few simple supplies. This easy step-by-step tutorial shows you exactly how to do it yourself.

    Use your favorite discs to bind your covers and your Happy Planner pages together.

     

     

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little spring planner tutorial. If you’d like to be among the first to know when I post more content like this, be sure to subscribe to the Kreative Updates email list. You’ll get this cool printable freebie when you do!

Free printable journaling cards

And to continue the blog hop, scoot on over to my friend Beth’s blog, Scrapping Wonders, for more mixed media fun, this time in a traveler’s notebook! Beth’s post

Or catch the whole thing:

Karen Fitting: Think Spring http://wp.me/pdovL-qG
Lisa Harris: Mixed Media Spring Planner Cover: http://mykreativepursuits.com/mixed-media-planner-cover/
Beth Soler: Mixed Media Travelers Notebook http://wp.me/p2E66M-2XQ
Kristie Sloan: Spring – Word Tags for all Seasons, home decor http://kristiesloan.com/spring-word-tags-for-all-seasons/

 

Slide1

Hello, and welcome to another DIY Friday! This month we’re tackling doilies! We’re turning those adorable, lacy bits of goodness into even lovelier creations with these three DIY techniques. Check out the video below for the full tutorial.

PrintingP1160595

DistressingP1160600

EmbossingP1160598

Be sure to leave me a comment and let me know you were here! How do you use doilies in your papercrafting?

 

DIY Friday January 2015

So, I learned about masking fluid in an online class I’m taking, Fun With Mixed Media. The second I saw the instructor use it, the wheels started turning in my head, and I thought “I bet I could make my own!” So that’s just what I did, and I’d love to share the process with you today.

First, gather your supplies. You’ll need squeeze bottles, rubber cement, and acetone or nail polish remover. I got the first two items at Hobby Lobby and the acetone at Wal-mart. PLEASE NOTE: Both rubber cement and acetone emit fumes. If you mix the two, please do so in a well-ventilated area and be aware of the risks involved with using both.

Supplies

From what I can gather, there are masking fluid kits you can purchase, for not a small amount of money, which give you a variety of tip sizes so you can better control the amount and flow of the fluid. I thought it might work to alter my squeeze bottles for the same effect, so I started by marking each bottle tip:

Mark

Then trimming them along the marks. Now I have a fine tip, a medium, and a large tip.Cut

Next, I poured some rubber cement into each bottle. I was experimenting, and not quite sure how much I would need, so I started with a third of a bottle. Caution: Your hands WILL be sticky pouring this stuff, but it’s kind of fun to roll it off with your fingertips. 🙂

Rubber CementOne third

Next came the acetone. Again, I wasn’t sure how much I would need, so I thought to start out with equal parts – in other words, a third of a squeeze bottle’s worth.

Acetone Equal parts

At this point, I shook each bottle to mix the cement and the acetone, then tried it out on a piece of scrap paper. I found it was way too runny, so I filled each bottle the rest of the way with rubber cement.

Finish with more cement

Shaken, not stirred

After shaking to blend it all, I had a masking fluid-type substance to try! I chose a piece of pink tone-on-tone floral patterned paper.

Pattern

I used the masking fluid on a few of the flowers, just swiping the tip of the bottle across the flowers.Mask

Then let them dry.

Dry

I smudged my handy-dandy craft mat (actually an oven liner from the Kitchen Store that cost a whopping $3.99 on sale) with Worn Lipstick and Spiced Marmalade Distress Inks.

Distress Ink

Spritzed with water to activate the ink,

Water

Then dipped my lovely little piece of patterned paper in the colors. It didn’t quite come out as I wanted, so I dabbed both ink pads on top of the wet paper, then spritzed it with water again.

Alter

Allow it to dry, and voila!

Dry Distressing

All that’s left to do is peel off the dry masking fluid to reveal the paper underneath.PeelReveal

There you  have it! An inexpensive alternative to store-bought masking fluid. Two parts rubber cement, one part (or a little less) acetone.

And if you’d like to learn more about what you can do with masking fluid, be sure and check out the Fun With Mixed Media class. It really is a lot of fun, and Ronda Palazzari is an excellent instructor.

See you soon!

And for more homemade art supplies, check out DIY Friday Modeling Paste

 

Nov 8

Welcome to the second week in the December Daily series of Scraps & Stash Saturday! Today I’m sharing a few of the divider pages I made for my 6×8 binder-ring album. To learn how to make them, be sure to watch the video on YouTube (while you’re there, might as well go ahead and subscribe to my channel).

IMG_1563

This will be the front page of my December Daily album. At the end of the month, I’ll do sort of a roundup journal entry about the highlights of our December.

IMG_1564

This page will likely hold a photo or two or some extensive journaling.

IMG_1567

Same thing for this page. Maybe I’ll do a collage of small photos or a couple of 4×4’s, along with some journaling.

IMG_1566

This has to be my most favorite, probably because I decided to break out the Mr. Huey’s and Tattered Angels mists to create it. I probably won’t add much more to this divider page, except maybe a title.

That’s it for this week. Be sure to watch the video to learn exactly how to make these easy dividers for your ring binder album.

 

 

DIY Friday Faux Flair Buttons

Wow, this is some sort of record for me – TWO DIY Fridays in a ROW! This idea just came to me while I was trying to fall asleep the other night (that ever happen to you?), so I just had to try it. Although it’s not what I envisioned (it rarely ever is), I’m happy with the result. Check out this short video tutorial:

DIY Friday 3.7.14

In light of my pledge to catch up on Monday Mojo prompts, I thought I’d do a little DIY Friday showing how I used this week’s color scheme and technique to create the embellishment prompt as well. Ha! Three birds, one stone! Hope you like it:

Hello all,

What a Monday! For a “day off,” I think I’ve worked harder than most Mondays! So, sorry, I’m a wee bit late bringing you this week’s Monday Mojo. Nevertheless, I’ve scanned my pin boards and rounded up some inpsiration. Let’s take a look:

1. Color Scheme

This palette from Design Seeds is called “Color Dawn,” and I just love the soft, restful colors. (A few of them play quite nicely with my February Scraps & Stash kit, too!)

ColorDawn600

2. Sketch

Such a restful palette needs a restful sketch, too, don’t you think? This one from Sketchabilities seems just right.

sketchabilities #109

3. Technique

This idea comes from a very unique and interesting blog called Hope Anchors the Soul, and it’s more a suggestion than a tutorial. Beautiful!

Technique

4. Handmade Embellishment

Embellishment

This idea comes from the Lily Bee blog. Just a fun little accent that would be perfect on any page, really.

There you  have it – a handful of inspiring starting points to get your mojo rolling for the week. Just seeing it all together makes me happy!

Remember, if you create something using any of these prompts, be sure to link me in the comments, and you will be entered to win a Fancy Pants Be.Loved 6×6 paper pad.

Fancy Pants 6x6

Till next time, go mojo!

 

Step 9f

So I’ve been playing with lots of art journal techniques since my last DIY post. In fact I hope to post some of my pages sometime in the near future, once my back-to-school routine is more settled. But one of the techniques I wanted to try was a throwback to an old art show on PBS I saw when I was a kid. My memory is vague about what the show was, but I have always remembered what I learned about creating a woodgrain look, and since it’s sort of trendy right now, I wanted to try my own version of it. My goal with my DIY creations is to always use them for an actual project, but I have simply not had time yet to create the page. Once I do, I’ll post Part 2.

So, for the technique, here are the steps I followed:

Step 1: Gather supplies. You’ll need a sheet of white cardstock (watercolor paper will work great too), a palette (I love to use foam plates for this), your favorite Distress Ink color (mine is Broken China!), a paintbrush the width that you will want your wood “planks” to be, a spray bottle of water, and colored pencils that coordinate with your chosen ink.

Step 1

Step 2: Tap your ink pad onto the palette to get a good patch of color.

Step 2

 

Step 3: Spritz your palette with water until you see the color beading up. The more water you add, the more of a color-wash look you’ll get.

Step 3

Step 4: Pick up a good amount of the watered-down ink with your paintbrush. You want there to be enough ink for a good, long stroke.

Step 4

 

Step 5: Beginning at the top corner of your paper, pull the paintbrush full of ink toward you. Don’t worry too much about the line being perfectly straight. That can be corrected when you come to the detail step. Once I pulled the brush down to the length I wanted, I then pushed back up following the same path. This adds another layer of color.

Note: You can pull the ink all the way from the top of the page to the bottom if you want uniform-length “planks.” I chose to  mix up the lengths so it looks more like mine are pieced together.

Step 5Step 6: Repeat Step 5, beginning your next stroke right where the last one ended, but be careful not to overlap them too much.

Step 6

Step 7: Keep going in this way across the page, again allowing your paint strokes to touch, but not overlap.

Step 7

The page with all the paint strokes. You can see the wood look beginning to emerge!

Step 8

Step 8: With your coordinating colored pencil, draw the lines between the planks. I was not too careful with this. Straight enough is good enough for me, but you can use a ruler if you prefer your edges to be perfectly straight. Don’t forget to draw the lines going both ways.

Step 9

Step 9: This is where the fun begins!  So here’s what I remember from that television art show: Wood-grain is all about the imperfections. The instructor said to begin with the knotholes. So with your colored pencil draw a knothole shape. For some reason, most of mine are almond-shaped, but there are all kinds – go crazy with it!

Step 9a

Step 10: Then begin to draw the “rings” around your knothole, keeping the shape of the knothole as you go. I’ve found that the closer you draw them together and the thinner  your pencil line, the more realistic the look. Mine will have a sort of Cosmo Cricket feel, as my lines are looser and a little bolder.

Step 9b

Step 11: Continue in this way until all your “planks” are done. I won’t lie to you – this part takes a little while, but I found it to be very relaxing.Step 9c

Voila!Step 9d

Step 12: I had a little bit of a happy accident while I was painting my paper, and I decided to run with it. After all my detail work was done, I mixed up a little more of the ink/water mixture, then used a stiff brush and flicked the ink droplets onto the paper. I think this really added something to the finished product. Step 9e Step 9f

So that’s it! The next time you have a hankering for a wood background, don’t hesitate to make your own! I’d love to see what you do with this technique – feel free to link me up to your creation in the comments! I’ll be back soon with a layout using mine.  🙂

DIY Friday modeling paste Pinnable
Always late to the party, I find that I am only now really digging into the artsy side of this hobby. I’ve developed a strong interest in creating an art journal, and in fact, will begin that process this weekend while I’m away at a retreat. Don’t get me wrong, I have TONS of artsy supplies already – paints, stains, inks, sprays, mists, even gesso. And I love getting messy and seeing what I can create. I just have yet to translate that into my regular scrappy routine.
At any rate, I’ve been on the hunt for videos and tutorials showing how to use certain products, and I came across this video, which triggered my memory of this thread on 2Ps, in which a generous poster shared her recipe for making your own modeling paste. I just had to try it!
So I started by gathering my supplies: talcum powder, Elmer’s glue, acrylic paint, a craft stick, and a screw-on lidded container.
Measured out 1/2 cup of the powder,
 2 tablespoons of the glue,
and 2 tablespoons of the paint. The original poster suggested using white paint. I didn’t have any, so I used cream instead. For my purposes, it worked great.
 The next step was to stir. I found that the mixture was a little too dry, so I added what probably amounted to another tablespoon of the glue.
 Then I got the consistency I had hoped for. To be honest, I’ve never used “real” modeling paste, so I didn’t really know what I was after.
So now that my recipe was complete, I wanted to test out the final product on an actual project! I started with a plain manila tag, then did a quick watercolor technique with Distress Inks.
Bonus DIY: I so loved the butterfly from the video that I wanted to recreate it. I still have Make the Cut software on my little old personal Cricut, so I was able to cut the images I wanted and to place them where I wanted them to be. I’m not sure, but I *THINK* Silhouette users have the same ability. Anyway, I did a Google images search for “butterfly stencil,” came up with TONS of images, and chose a bunch that I liked. Grouped them together on the virtual mat, set it to multi-cut 5 times, loaded a 6 x 6 stencil blank, and bam! Custom stencils!
The homemade paste went on like butter.
It worked exactly as I had hoped it would. I hit it with the heat gun for a little bit to hurry
along the drying process.
Finally, I used my two favorite Distress Ink colors – Broken China and Dusty Concord – to wash over the paste. Next time I’ll probably just use a mist, but I like the funky effect of this well enough. And, bonus – it smells sweet too!

So there you have it! Go mix up a batch and show me what you do with it!

Here’s that recipe, directly from the post on 2Ps:
1/2 cup Baking Soda or Talcum Powder
2 Tablespoons PVA glue ( the white glue that dries clear)
1-2 Tablespoons acrylic paint. ( I usually use white )
Mix all together and store in an airtight container. I found that the talc gives a smoother texture than the baking soda. …..and it smells nice too. You may need to add a few drops if water to get the right consistency.
(Quoting kiwifarmer)

Love mixed media? Want to learn more, including lots of creative ways to use your new batch of modeling paste? Join me in the awesome Ronda Palazzari’s class over at Craftsy, Fun With Mixed Media.

Ronda Palazzari Fun With Mixed Media Class

 

And for more homemade art supplies, check out DIY Friday Masking Fluid